Since the second-wave feminist movement of the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s to the debate over reproductive rights and the global phenomenon of #MeToo, a number of social and political factors have brought increased attention to issues of sexual violence and assault. Unfortunately, the problem endures: Today, it is estimated that 1 in 6 American women and about 3 percent of American men have been the victim of an attempted or completed rape.

“Though by no means a comprehensive answer to the problem of assault, creating clearer parameters to the definition of consent can help move the needle on the larger mission of eliminating sexual violence,” said Brenda Ingram, director of Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention and Services at USC Student Health.

Ingram, who is also a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and the behavioral sciences at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, shed light on what affirmative consent is, what is being done about it at USC and why it should be made a legal standard in all states.
— Read on news.usc.edu/159880/what-is-affirmative-consent-usc-prevent-sexual-violence/