Do You Have An Obligation To Protect Your Employees?

We all have thought about what our perfect job would look like whether we have the qualifications are not we have thought about it. Well I was reading a fairly old article but the information is very relevant to today’s life experiences. The question I ask is when we are looking for our perfect job do we also look at if they have policies in place to protect me against work and family violence. This is just an excerpt from a article I recently read.

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On May 16, 1986, gunshots rang out in the 46th-floor trading room of Smith Barney Harris Upham & Company’s midtown Manhattan offices.

Twenty-two-year-old Richard Wagenknecht entered the building that evening to confront his ex-girlfriend, 24-year-old Susana Jimenez. He tried to pull a ring off her finger, and when she resisted, he shot her in the head, fatally wounding her. Susana’s 35-year-old colleague Charles Walker tried to come to her aid, but Wagenknecht shot him twice in the chest, killing him. Wagenknecht then turned the gun on himself, but he survived.

The image of domestic violence as a “family matter” contained within the home is an outdated and dangerous notion. Often, domestic abuse spills into the workplace–with devastating consequences for victims, their colleagues, and their employers.The image of domestic violence as a ‘family matter’ contained within the home is an outdated and dangerous notion.

A victim may be harassed over the phone or email, be absent because of injuries, or simply be less productive due to extreme stress. If a victim has tried to leave a relationship, the workplace may be the first place an abuser comes looking.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and my office is working to raise awareness of the proactive steps that companies can take to help ensure their workers’ safety. After all, no workplace is immune to domestic abuse. Nearly one in four large private companies reported at least one incidence of domestic violence in the previous year, according to a study by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

And one-third of all women killed in U.S. workplaces between 2003 and 2008 were killed by a current or former intimate partner.

https://www.fastcompany.com/3037083/employers-responsibility-to-victims-of-domestic-violence?cid=search

You can ask your human resource dept. what are the protocol on family violence/workplace violence.