Aged care residents receive half the funding of prisoners

Aged care residents receive around half the government funding of prisoners, the CEO of a Tasmanian nursing home has told local media.

Aged Care Deloraine CEO, Charlie Emmerton, told The Advocate it was “really sad” older members of the community receive such low levels of funding.

“On average we get $50,000 a year for a resident, which includes their daily care, cleaning, washing, medication, and food.

“If I was running a prison I would get $100,000 per inmate. In a prison they don’t need to be toileted or hand fed or help with putting their clothes on,” he said.

Mr Emmerton was commenting on the latest report by StewartBrown, which shows more than 50 per cent of the aged care operators surveyed are making a loss.

The results are even worse in outer regional and remote areas, where 65 per cent of homes made a loss, compared with 47 per cent in cities.

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We Calculated How Much a Baby Costs Per Month, and, Oh Baby, Is It a Lot. Corinne Sullivan

As exciting as it is to welcome a new addition to your family, it’s also majorly taxing on your physical health, your mental health, and — of course — your finances. Money may not be the first consideration for those thinking about welcoming a child into their lives, but we probably don’t have to tell you that a baby is a major investment. Yes, they’re cute. But they also have a lot of needs and, as a result, a lot of expenses — many of which you may not have considered. How much does a baby cost per month? Let’s break it down.


According to the 2015 Expenditures on Children by Families report, a married, two-child, middle-income family (earning between $59,200 and $107,400 annually) could expect to spend approximately $12,680 in the first year of their younger child’s life. If you take into account an average annual inflation rate of 2.2 percent — as well as the fact that one-child households spend an average of 27 percent more on the single child — that $12,680 could be over $17,500 in a one-child, middle-income household in 2019, which equals out to almost $1,500 a month. Whoa, baby.
So what exactly does that $1,500 a month go toward? The initial cost will obviously be more than your average monthly expenditures, especially if you’re welcoming your first baby. Before your bundle of joy arrives, you’ll need baby furniture, and The Bump estimates that you’ll likely spend about $2,000 for a nursery set, including the crib, changing table, rocker, and dresser. You’ll also require a car seat (which costs an average of $175) and a stroller (which can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to a thousand, depending on the model). There’s also the cost of giving birth itself, which can rack up an out-of-pocket bill anywhere from $2,244 to $2,669, depending on your type of birth, according to a 2013 survey conducted by Truven Health Analytics, in partnership with Childbirth Connection, Catalyst for Payment Reform, and Healthcare Quality & Payment Reform.

Related:
We Calculated How Much a Baby’s First Year Costs and . . . You Might Want to Sit Down

After that initial investment, you’ll have to budget for those recurring expenses, which include diapers, nursing and feeding, health insurance, child care, and clothing. You might be surprised to learn that babies go through an average of six to 12 diapers a day, according to the National Diaper Bank Network, and that can set you back $70 to $80 per month. And if you cannot or choose not to breastfeed, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children calculates that formula can cost up to $150 per month.
In your baby’s first year, you can expect to make six visits for evaluations and immunizations, plus a few additional visits for illnesses, and the cost will vary dramatically depending on your healthcare policy. Then there’s childcare. According to a Care.com survey, the average weekly childcare cost for a baby in 2019 is $199 for a family care center, $211 for a daycare center, and $596 for a nanny, which equals out to a range of $796 per month to $2,384 per month. Clothing costs will also depend on your needs, as you could spend an average of $60 a month, according to Investopedia, though that largely depends on your family’s needs and income.
Bottom line: babies are expensive. Before you make that major life decision, take a careful look at your finances, since you’ll need an average of $1,500 a month in your first year. Babies are life changing, and wonderful, and cute as can be, but for something so small, they sure cost a heck of a lot.

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Moms & Dads Should Be Monitored Together for Postpartum Depression.

A new study found that even mild, long-term depressive symptoms among moms lead to emotional problems for kids. Researchers also pointed out that one parent’s depression puts the other at risk.

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Source: Maressa Brown

The more we talk about mental health, the better—especially when it comes to expectant and new parents. After all, one parent’s struggle with depression puts the other at risk—and can affect a child’s emotional well-being, too. That’s the conclusion of a new study out of the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL).

Using data collected from the Children’s Sleep and Health study—in which over 1,600 expecting families in Finland were studied from the final stages of pregnancy through to when the child turned five—researchers looked at how depressive symptoms of both parents affected a child at ages two and five. They concluded that a dad’s depression lead to emotional problems for a child, such as hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety, only if the mom was depressed, as well. Meanwhile, mom’s depressive symptoms, even if they were considered “mild,” affected the child regardless of a father’s depression.

Visiting Researcher Johanna Pietikäinen from the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) said in a press release on the study, “In families, depression experienced by the mother has a key impact on the child’s well-being.” The researchers recommend health care providers pay attention to depressive symptoms among moms from the time they’re pregnant through the child’s first birthday.

The researcher also pointed out that not only does suffering from depression before pregnancy put one at risk for moderate to severe depression during and after those nine months, but one partner’s depressive symptoms put the other partner at risk, as well. For that reason, the mental well-being of both parents should be monitored during pregnancy and after the baby is born. If one partner appears to be suffering from depression, the other should be examined.

This recommendation is particularly newsworthy, as Pietikäinen explained that “fathers’ psychological well-being is not necessarily covered by depression questionnaires in maternity clinics.”

Researchers also pinpointed the following as risk factors: sleep deprivation during pregnancy, stress, anxiety and a bad family

“Depression among parents both during and after pregnancy not only affects the person suffering from depression but also has a long-term impact on the well-being of the newborn child,” Pietikäinen explained. “Even in cases of mild depression, it is important that the symptoms are identified and the parents are offered support as early as possible, if necessary already during the pregnancy.”

First Trimester Signs and Symptoms.

Congrats! During the first trimester, you’re getting used to the idea of being pregnant, and pregnancy symptoms week by week can vary big time! Learn how to deal with morning sickness and exhaustion during this early pregnancy phase. The bump website offers this wonderful chart that’s week by week.

Surprise! One week pregnant is actually not pregnant at all. Say what?!

Most OBs count pregnancy starting from the first day of your last period. That’s because ovulation and conception are really tough to pinpoint, but the physical signs of menstruation are much easier to spot. So in doctor speak, 1 week pregnant means you’re on your period and not yet pregnant. You won’t actually conceive your baby until week two or three, depending on the length of your cycle.

If you’ve just found out you’re expecting, you might think this is your first week of pregnancy, but you’re probably around 4 weeks pregnant. Yes, already! (Your OB will give you a more accurate estimate when you go in for your first prenatal appointment.) Skip ahead and check out week 4.

1 Week Pregnant Symptoms

At 1 week pregnant—remember at this early stage, the symptoms you’re experiencing are those typical to your period because you’re not actually pregnant. These symptoms may last from three to seven days, and can include:

  • Vaginal bleeding. You body is shedding the uterine lining, which holds last month’s unfertilized egg.
  • Lower back pain and cramps. To release that lining, your uterus contracts, causing your back and abdomen to ache.
  • Bloating. Fluctuating hormones can give you a bloated belly right before and during your period.
  • Mood swings. Those raging hormones can also cause irritability and wreak havoc on your emotions.
  • Headache. Many women complain of menstrual migraines, which are also hormone related. (Surprise, surprise.) Ice packs, OTC pain relievers, and relaxation exercises may help ease the pain.

1 Week Pregnant Belly

Inside your 1 week pregnant belly, your body isn’t only releasing last month’s egg. It begins to form a new uterine lining, which will hold next month’s egg. You know, the one that will hopefully get fertilized and grow and develop into a fetus?!

Cool fact: Human eggs are the largest cells in the body. An egg is the size of peach fuzz. Your body will release one (or in rare cases, two) eggs somewhere between day 10 and day 19 of your menstrual cycle—or about 14 days before your next period is expected. It can be fertilized for about 12 to 24 hours after that. Oh, and having sex before then is helpful too, since sperm can live in your body for up to six days.

The first signs of pregnancy won’t occur right away—in fact, many women miss their period at week 4 before they even feel “different.” But some common early signs of pregnancy in the first weeks after fertilization include breast soreness or tenderness, nausea, fatigue, and frequent urge to pee.

At one week pregnant (a.k.a. hoping to be pregnant soon!), you’re probably thinking about how you can prep your body to carry a baby. It’s a good idea to start pregnancy at a healthy weight and free of bad habits such as smoking and drinking. Reduce your caffeine intake to the equivalent of a cup of coffee or two (we’re talking 8 ounce cups—not the venti!) per day.

1 Week Pregnant Ultrasound

You’re not likely to have a 1 week pregnant ultrasound. But if you’ve been trying for a while to get pregnant and have seen a fertility specialist, you may have had an ultrasound to check for fibroids, to see how many follicles (which grow into eggs) are in your ovaries and/or to gauge the thickness of your uterine lining. If there are any problems, your doctor can prescribe a fertility treatment that can help you conceive.

Now, get ready to have some sex. You’ve got a baby to make!

Pregnancy Checklist at 1 Week Pregnant

Reminders for the week: