Red Flags That Your Childs Being Bullied.

Bullying is a much more serious problem than ever before. Your child may have a bully without you even knowing about it. Many children won’t want to talk about it for fear of even worse retaliation. Also, it’s an embarrassing topic. There are signs you can look for, though.

Counselors provide several red flags to look out for if you suspect your kid is a victim of bullying.

RED FLAGS THAT REVEAL YOUR CHILD’S THE VICTIM OF A BULLY

1. SIGNS OF PHYSICAL ALTERCATIONS

Every kid gets injured. It’s a part of growing up. Children might get hurt from playing sports, playing with friends, or learning some valuable life lessons. However, you should keep your eyes open if you notice that your child seems to come home with physical injuries or ripped clothing more often than usual.

If you do notice injuries, ask your child what happened in a non-confrontational way. You should also keep your eye open for your kid, trying to cover up their bruises. You might notice them wearing long sleeves in summer or refusing to wear clothes that show off their body when they usually would wear those clothes.

read more for additional signs

apple.news/Alf_gcSX6PC2WqjPWd3V7xw

The Everyday Activist Guide » 10 Things You Can Do To Combat Workplace Violence.

I really like this website Future Without Violence, they provide so much great information this article give tips on being a activist against sexual violence. We are living in an extraordinary time. Survivors of sexual violence are coming forward and some are finally being heard and believed.

And while a few powerful abusers are paying the price for their unlawful conduct, workplaces overall have been slow to respond to the structural, institutional, and cultural norms that underlie #metoo in the workplace.

But what if we could stop sexual assault and harassment in the workplace before it happens?

We can. Together.
— Read on checkyourworkplace.com/activist-guide/

Texas Gets It Right, First.

I was going through my articles that I read for additional information on certain topics and I saw this article from a couple of years ago concerning rape kit reform. Take a look, In June 2017, Texas became the first state in the nation to enact all of Joyful Heart’s six legislative pillars of comprehensive rape kit reform. We asked Ilse Knecht, Joyful Heart’s Director of Policy & Advocacy, what this legislative victory means for our work. Watch a video of her conversation with Christine Show, Digital Platforms Manager.

More information about this article click the link.

www.joyfulheartfoundation.org/blog/our-perspective-texas-rape-kit-reform-paves-way-justice-survivors

When Domestic Violence Becomes A Workplace Issue After two employees were killed, the hospital where they worked decided to tackle the issue head-on. By Melissa Jeltsen.

Photo by Павел Сорокин on Pexels.com

The two deaths came in quick succession, shocking the close-knit community of health care workers at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center.

First, in August 2013, an administrative assistant was fatally shot by her estranged husband while she was helping her 3-year-old son get into a car. Five months later, a nurse who worked with oncology patients was stabbed to death by her son after a history of domestic altercations.

“She was very optimistic and positive,” said Michele McKee, director of nursing services. “The staff is still struggling with the loss. There was denial. Tears. Anger. And then, guilt. What did we miss? What could we have done?”

While hospital staff had been trained to identify patients who were experiencing domestic violence, they didn’t pay the same attention to warning signs in their own peers, said Leslie Hott, St. Joseph’s human resources manager.

“Our value statement says, ‘loving service, compassionate care,’” Hott said. “We typically think about that for those we care for, but not each other.”

That is now changing.

St. Joseph is undergoing an ambitious effort to address domestic violence among its workforce, rolling out an intensive training program to help staff members identify — and hopefully prevent — domestic violence, as well as a new workplace policy to support employees who are suffering. 

The hospital partnered with Futures Without Violence, a nonprofit that has helped organizations across the country address how domestic violence hurts its workforce. In 2014, Futures began a pilot site project called Low Wage, High Risk to develop best practices for workplaces where employees may be vulnerable to physical and sexual violence. The nonprofit is currently collaborating with tomato crop workers in Florida and restaurant employees in New York, as well as health care workers at St. Joseph in Towson.

The hospital didn’t have a formal workplace domestic violence policy in place when its staffers were killed. Most organizations across the country don’t, even though domestic violence affects 1 in 4 women in the U.S.

There was denial. Tears. Anger. And then, guilt. What did we miss? What could we have done?Michele McKee, director of nursing services

To read more about this article visit https://www.huffpost.com/entry/domestic-violence-workplace-safety_n_56df528ee4b065e2e3d3f8da?guccounter=1